Direct link to Wing leadership helps‘max perform’ Airmen’s time

The Hurlburt Time Saver button, a clickable shortcut, was added to desktops base wide at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017. The button is a tool Air Commandos can use to submit ideas and requests to the 1st Special Operations Wing leadership to help maximize the performance of the Airmen and the base.

The Hurlburt Time Saver button, a clickable shortcut, was added to desktops base wide at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017. The button is a tool Air Commandos can use to submit ideas and requests to the 1st Special Operations Wing leadership to help maximize the performance of the Airmen and the base.

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- The Hurlburt Time Saver button, a clickable shortcut, was added to desktops base wide Feb. 9.

The button, a clock being thrown in the trash with an interdictory circle, is a tool Air Commandos can use to submit ideas and requests to the 1st Special Operations Wing leadership to help maximize the performance of the Airmen and the base.

“It’s tough to know everything going on within the units,” said Col. Thomas Palenske, the commander of the 1st SOW. “I want to know what I can put my weight behind to help ‘max perform’ the Airmen’s time.”

Airmen are encouraged to identify training, requirements or processes that aren't maximizing their time.

“Colonel Palenske is getting after the Chief of Staff of the Air Force’s guidance of reducing the impact of additional duties that make it harder for Airmen to accomplish the mission,” said Maj. Brian Schmidt, executive officer to the commander of the 1st SOW. “In addition, he is further empowering squadrons on base as the primary war-fighting units.”

Schmidt said although this program is not a replacement for Airmen’s chain of command, it is a different avenue for people to get that information in front of leadership.

“Colonel Palenske is serious when he says he wants to get this information and put it into action,” he added.

Leadership is looking for all suggestions that could positively affect Air Commandos’ time, such as suggestions received about improving the flow of traffic leaving the base, deployment processing and updating out-of-date guidance.

“The best ideas don’t come from me, or other commanders,” Palenske said. “They come from the Airmen out there doing the mission.”