NDI specialist bring imperfections to light

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

Airman 1st Class Brian Sheldon, a non-destructive inspection journeyman with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, stands with a magnetic particle unit at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. A magnetic particle unit blocks light from hitting the prop rod allowing the florescent light to glow indicating imperfections on parts. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the insides of metal objects to identify possible defects in systems and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)

HURLBURT FIELD. Fla., -- Non-destructive inspection Airmen with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron examine aircraft parts for defects at Hurlburt Field Fla., Oct. 17, 2016. These specialist use noninvasive methods to inspect the inside and outside of metal objects to identify possible flaws in systems and equipment. One inspection method is to perform a florescent dye penetrant that glows under a black light to reveal defects. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Andrea Posey)