Rehabbing Airman back into the fight

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. David Desjardin, training management section chief for 1st Special Operations Maintenance Operations Squadron (left), gets assistance from Senior Airman David Curley, noncommissioned officer in charge of physical therapy for 1st Special Operations Medical Operations Squadron, with passive range of motion during physical training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. Physical training technicians are primarily concerned with the remediation of injuries and disabilities to promote mobility, functional ability, movement potential and quality of life. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. David Desjardin, training management section chief for 1st Special Operations Maintenance Operations Squadron (left), gets assistance from Senior Airman David Curley, noncommissioned officer in charge of physical therapy for 1st Special Operations Medical Operations Squadron, with passive range of motion during physical training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. Physical training technicians are primarily concerned with the remediation of injuries and disabilities to promote mobility, functional ability, movement potential and quality of life. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Aaron Mosher, an aerospace ground equipment mechanic for 1st Special Operations Equipment Squadron, goes through a workout during physical training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. Many of the patients seen are post-surgery patients, attending physical therapy for about six months. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Aaron Mosher, an aerospace ground equipment mechanic for 1st Special Operations Equipment Squadron, goes through a workout during physical training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. Many of the patients seen are post-surgery patients, attending physical therapy for about six months. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway)

A physical therapy banner sits next to a table at the Physical Training building on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. On average, technicians see 25 to 30 patients on daily. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway)

A physical therapy banner sits next to a table at the Physical Training building on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. On average, technicians see 25 to 30 patients on daily. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Aaron Mosher, an aerospace ground equipment mechanic for 1st Special Operations Equipment Squadron, goes through a workout during physical training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. Physical training technicians are primarily concerned with the remediation of injuries and disabilities as well as the promotion of mobility, functional ability, quality of life and movement potential through examination, evaluation, diagnosis and physical intervention. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jeffrey Parkinson)

U.S Air Force Airman 1st Class Aaron Mosher, an aerospace ground equipment mechanic for 1st Special Operations Equipment Squadron, goes through a workout during physical training on Hurlburt Field, Fla., May 29, 2013. Physical training technicians are primarily concerned with the remediation of injuries and disabilities as well as the promotion of mobility, functional ability, quality of life and movement potential through examination, evaluation, diagnosis and physical intervention. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jeffrey Parkinson)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. -- Physical therapists from the 1st Special Operations Medical Operations Squadron use rehab to help recovering Airmen regain their ability to accomplish the mission.

When an Air Commando is injured during physical training, work or recovering from recent surgery, their primary care manager will recommend visiting physical therapy technicians at the 1st SOMDOS.

Physical therapy is offered to all active duty service members at Hurlburt Field. It is primarily concerned with the remediation of injuries and disabilities and the promotion of mobility, functional ability, quality of life and movement potential through examination, evaluation, diagnosis and physical intervention.

"Our primary focus is to give the best possible care to our patients and to rehab them to get back into the fight." said Senior Airman David Curley, noncommissioned officer-in-charge of physical therapy for 1st SOMDOS.

The technicians are very dedicated on making sure all their patients are healthy and ready to return to the fight by using techniques including muscle group strengthening, range of motion, and flexibility training with their patient.


"I wasn't able to run," said Airman 1st Class Aaron Mosher, aerospace ground equipment mechanic for the 1st Special Operations Equipment Maintenance Squadron. "They were able to help me continue running with my flight."

On average, the technicians see 25 to 30 patients on a daily basis, usually working with them for one to one and a half hours. Most of the Airmen seen are post-surgery patients recovering from knee or shoulder repairs and attend physical therapy for about six months.

Physical therapy for Hurlburt Field is held in high esteem for the technicians rehab the active duty populations on base to get the "boots back on the ground" following an injury.

"It's rewarding to see someone after an injury to come back to us five to six months later, excited about what they accomplished on their PT test," said Airman 1st Class Jakarrious Marshall, 1st SOMDOS physical therapy technician.