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Air Commandos control corrosion

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays paint onto the hatch of a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Applying paint is the final step in the several- day corrosion preventive process. This final paint layer ensures the aircraft body will combat corrosion from the elements and prolong the life of the asset. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays paint onto the hatch of a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Applying paint is the final step in the several- day corrosion preventive process. This final paint layer ensures the aircraft body will combat corrosion from the elements and prolong the life of the asset. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays rain erosion prevention paint onto a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29 2017. Rain erosion prevention paint gives the propellers an extra layer of protection against environmental exposure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays rain erosion prevention paint onto a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29 2017. Rain erosion prevention paint gives the propellers an extra layer of protection against environmental exposure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays a rain erosion prevention paint onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Rain erosion prevention paint gives the propellers an extra layer of protection against environmental exposure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays a rain erosion prevention paint onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Rain erosion prevention paint gives the propellers an extra layer of protection against environmental exposure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Corrosion control Airmen restore the structural integrity of aircraft by repainting parts of the body that have been weakened by exposure to the environment, prolonging the life of the asset. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Corrosion control Airmen restore the structural integrity of aircraft by repainting parts of the body that have been weakened by exposure to the environment, prolonging the life of the asset. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Sanding down the equipment is the first step in a several day process to ensure the new primer and paint adhere to the surface of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Sanding down the equipment is the first step in a several day process to ensure the new primer and paint adhere to the surface of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Corrosion control Airmen restore the structural integrity of aircraft by repainting parts of the body that have been weakened by exposure to the environment and conducting composite repairs, prolonging the life of the asset. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Corrosion control Airmen restore the structural integrity of aircraft by repainting parts of the body that have been weakened by exposure to the environment and conducting composite repairs, prolonging the life of the asset. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Primer is applied after the old paint is sanded and wiped away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Primer is applied after the old paint is sanded and wiped away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, uses a lift to get in position to spray primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Primer is applied after the old paint is sanded and wiped away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Logan Winningham, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, uses a lift to get in position to spray primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. Primer is applied after the old paint is sanded and wiped away. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. The primer has corrosion preventive qualities and gives the paint a surface to adhere to. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. The primer has corrosion preventive qualities and gives the paint a surface to adhere to. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. The primer has corrosion preventive qualities and gives the paint a surface to adhere to. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)
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Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sprays primer onto a CV-22 Osprey propeller at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 29, 2017. The primer has corrosion preventive qualities and gives the paint a surface to adhere to. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Sanding down the equipment is the first step in a several day process to ensure the new primer and paint adhere to the surface of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

Airman 1st Class Ethan Short, an aircraft structural maintainer with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron, sands down a propeller to remove paint from a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Sanding down the equipment is the first step in a several day process to ensure the new primer and paint adhere to the surface of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac O. Guest IV)

HURLBURT FIELD,Fla. --

Air Commandos with the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron restored a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., March 28, 2017. Corrosion control Airmen restore the structural integrity of aircraft by repainting parts of the body every two years that have been weakened by exposure to the environment; prolonging the life of the asset. These Air Commandos ensure CV-22’s are ready to deploy rapidly in order to respond to critical situations globally by ensuring the aircraft has protection against the elements it will encounter.