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801st Air Commandos ensure CV-22 Osprey's global operational readiness

Air Commandos with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron ensure CV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft are ready to execute global operations anytime, anyplace. The Osprey combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing characteristics of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Air Commandos with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron ensure CV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft are ready to execute global operations anytime, anyplace. The Osprey combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing characteristics of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Airman 1st Class Curtis Masenheimer, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, gathers tools to perform maintenance on a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 27, 2016. Crew chiefs with the 801st SOAMXS are trained to diagnose malfunctions on the Osprey during pre and post-flight inspections, repair and refuel the aircraft, keep detailed records and ensure the aircraft are mission ready at all times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Airman 1st Class Curtis Masenheimer, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, gathers tools to perform maintenance on a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 27, 2016. Crew chiefs with the 801st SOAMXS are trained to diagnose malfunctions on the Osprey during pre and post-flight inspections, repair and refuel the aircraft, keep detailed records and ensure the aircraft are mission ready at all times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Jonathan Knutson, left, and Airman 1st Class Curtis Masenheimer, crew chiefs with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, perform maintenance on the tail of a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 27, 2016. Crew chiefs with the 801st SOAMXS are trained to diagnose malfunctions on the Osprey during pre and post-flight inspections, repair and refuel the aircraft, keep detailed records and ensure the aircraft are mission ready at all times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Jonathan Knutson, left, and Airman 1st Class Curtis Masenheimer, crew chiefs with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, perform maintenance on the tail of a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 27, 2016. Crew chiefs with the 801st SOAMXS are trained to diagnose malfunctions on the Osprey during pre and post-flight inspections, repair and refuel the aircraft, keep detailed records and ensure the aircraft are mission ready at all times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Dane Devlin, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, greases an engine part for a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 27, 2016. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing characteristics of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Dane Devlin, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, greases an engine part for a CV-22 Osprey at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 27, 2016. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing characteristics of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

The CV-22 Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing characteristics of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

The CV-22 Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing characteristics of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Dane Devlin, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, holds a de-ice boot onto a CV-22 Osprey while another crew chief screws it in at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 29, 2016. A de-icing boot is an ice protection system installed on aircraft surfaces to perform mechanical de-icing on aircraft in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Dane Devlin, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, holds a de-ice boot onto a CV-22 Osprey while another crew chief screws it in at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 29, 2016. A de-icing boot is an ice protection system installed on aircraft surfaces to perform mechanical de-icing on aircraft in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Marcus Clement, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, reviews a task guide at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 29, 2016. Crew chiefs with the 801st SOAMXS are trained to diagnose malfunctions on the Osprey during pre and post-flight inspections, repair and refuel the aircraft, keep detailed records and ensure the aircraft are mission ready at all times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Marcus Clement, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, reviews a task guide at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 29, 2016. Crew chiefs with the 801st SOAMXS are trained to diagnose malfunctions on the Osprey during pre and post-flight inspections, repair and refuel the aircraft, keep detailed records and ensure the aircraft are mission ready at all times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Marcus Clement, right, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, holds the de-ice boot for a CV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft while Staff Sgt. Dane Devlin, a crew chief with the 801st SOAMXS, removes it at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 29, 2016. A de-icing boot is an ice protection system installed on aircraft surfaces to perform mechanical de-icing on aircraft in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

Staff Sgt. Marcus Clement, right, a crew chief with the 801st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, holds the de-ice boot for a CV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft while Staff Sgt. Dane Devlin, a crew chief with the 801st SOAMXS, removes it at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Sept. 29, 2016. A de-icing boot is an ice protection system installed on aircraft surfaces to perform mechanical de-icing on aircraft in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

The CV-22 Osprey is powered by two turboshaft engines, each rated at 6,150 shaft horsepower. The Osprey has graphite/fiberglass rotor blades and a composite/metal airframe. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

The CV-22 Osprey is powered by two turboshaft engines, each rated at 6,150 shaft horsepower. The Osprey has graphite/fiberglass rotor blades and a composite/metal airframe. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. --