Units

1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron

1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron emblem significance: Blue represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow signifies the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The owl, a night predator, reflects the unit's mission of supporting covert operation units. The shield denotes the Air Force mission of defending the peace. The wrench and dagger symbolize the interdependence between operations and maintenance.

1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron emblem significance: Blue represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow signifies the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The owl, a night predator, reflects the unit's mission of supporting covert operation units. The shield denotes the Air Force mission of defending the peace. The wrench and dagger symbolize the interdependence between operations and maintenance.


Mission
The 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron (1 SOMXS) is dedicated to supporting the generation of safe, reliable, combat capable aircraft and equipment ensuring Air Force Special Operations Command can accomplish its mission “Any Time, Any Place.” Eight flights comprised of more than 650 active duty, civilian, and contractor personnel provide organizational and intermediate-level repair capability for a variety of special mission platforms including the AC-130J, AC-130U, MC-130H Combat Talon II, and CV-22B aircraft.

The Accessories Flight performs intermediate-level hydraulic, electrical, and environmental system maintenance as well as organizational-level fuel systems maintenance on aircraft assigned to and transiting through Hurlburt Field.

The Centralized Repair Facility (CRF) Flight represents Air Force Special Operations Command’s (AFSOC) sole source for T-56 engines, propellers, AFSOC-unique avionics and electronic warfare components, and performs Isochronal Inspections for all AFSOC C-130 mission-design series platforms. Special Communications resides inside the CRF and performs operational testing and development of on-going special communications programs in support of the United States Special Operations Command and the Department of Defense.

The Maintenance Flight provides heavy maintenance for all Hurlburt Field assigned C-130 platforms to include flight control, landing gear, and doors. They also provide crash recovery and response capabilities for the airfield and surrounding communities.

Fabrication Flight is comprised of four elements accomplishing extensive metal, fiberglass, and fabric repair. The Nondestructive Inspection Element detects flaws on and in aircraft components using state of the art equipment. The Corrosion Element prevents aircraft part failures by combating effects of environmental exposure and metal fatigue. The Sheet Metal Element and the Metals Technology Element utilize advanced equipment and techniques to reverse engineer and manufacture parts and provides welding support to the 1st Special Operations Wing (SOW).

Armament Flight inspects and maintains the AC-130J and AC-130U gunship advanced weaponry suite. They also repair, functional check, and configure the many different weapons unique to AFSOC aircraft.
The Munitions Flight consists of three sections providing cradle to grave surveillance of Team Hurlburt’s non-nuclear munitions stockpile valued at $31.5M. The Systems Section schedules and controls all munitions actions utilizing the Combat Ammunition System. The Production Section assembles, disassembles, and delivers munitions. The Materiel Section receives ships, inspects, warehouses, and disposes of munitions in accordance with applicable guidance.

The Aerospace Ground Equipment Flight repair, services, inspects, and delivers more than
720 pieces of powered and non-powered flight line support equipment. The flight is comprised of three Combat AGE Teams, Maintenance, Inspections, and Serving and Dispatch sections.

The Programs Flight synchronizes the day-to-day functions required to ensure unity of effort among the other seven flights. The mobility and training sections mobilizes personnel and equipment to support worldwide operations at a moment's notice. A staff of production supervisors ensures the 1 SOMXS works effectively with all of the 1 SOW squadrons.

Lineage
Constituted 16th Bomb Maintenance Squadron, Very Heavy, on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on
20 Nov 1943. Disbanded on 12 Oct 1944. Reconstituted, and redesigned 16th Maintenance Squadron on 23 Aug 1995. Activated on 15 Sep 1995. Redesignated the 1st Special Operations Maintenance Squadron on 16 November 2006. Inactivated on 16 Sep 2013. Activated on 10 Aug 2015.
Assignments
468th Bomb Group, 20 Nov. 1943 - 12 Oct 1944; 16th Logistics (later, 16th Maintenance);
1st Special Operations Maintenance Group, 15 Sept 1995 - 21 Jun 2013 deactivated. Reactivated on 10 Aug 2015.

Stations
Smokey Hill AAF, KS, 20 Nov 1943-11 Feb 1944; Bombay, India, 2 Apr 1944; Kharagpur, India, 12 Apr-12 Oct 1944. Eglin AFB, FL, 15 Sep 1995; Hurlburt Field, FL, 7 May-16 Sep 2013. Hurlburt Field, FL, 10 Aug 2015-current.
Honors
Service Streamers.
World War II Asiatic-Pacific Theater

Decorations
Meritorious Unit Award
1 Jul 2007 - 30 Jun 2009
1 Oct 2009 – 30 Sep 2011
1 Oct 2011 – 30 Oct 2013
1 Oct 2013 – 30 Sep 2015

Air Force Outstanding Unit Award w/Valor
1 Jun 1997 - 31 May 1999
1 Jul 2003 - 30 Jun 2005
1 Jul 2005 - 28 Jun 2007

Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards
15 Sep 1995 - 31 May 1997
1 Jul 1999 - 30 Jun 2001
1 Jul 2001 - 30 Jun 2003
1 Jul 2004 - 1 Jun 2006

Emblem Significance
Ultramarine blue and Air Force yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of The Owl, a night predator, reflects the unit’s mission of supporting covert operation units. The shield denotes the Air Force mission of defending peace. The wrench and dagger symbolize the interdependence between operations and maintenance.