Units

505th Command and Control Wing

505th Command and Control Wing: The blue background represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations.  The bamboo curtain signifies the units service in Vietnam.  The control and direction of strike aircraft against the enemy by Forward Air Controllers is symbolized by the flight symbols in chief.  The flight symbols in base allude to the control of aircraft for effective air defense.  The double bevile refers to lightning and represents the unit’s complete ground/air communications support, search and direction capability.  The crescents symbolize the moon going through its phases and represent the Wing’s continuing performance of its mission month in and month out.  The emblem bears the National colors and the Air Force colors of gold and ultramarine blue.

505th Command and Control Wing: The blue background represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. The bamboo curtain signifies the units service in Vietnam. The control and direction of strike aircraft against the enemy by Forward Air Controllers is symbolized by the flight symbols in chief. The flight symbols in base allude to the control of aircraft for effective air defense. The double bevile refers to lightning and represents the unit’s complete ground/air communications support, search and direction capability. The crescents symbolize the moon going through its phases and represent the Wing’s continuing performance of its mission month in and month out. The emblem bears the National colors and the Air Force colors of gold and ultramarine blue.


The 505th Command and Control Wing is a subordinate unit to the United States Air Force Warfare Center, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The USAFWC serves as the lead agency to pull command and control together across the Air Force. Under the mantle of the USAFWC, the 505 CCW is the focal point for integration of all aerospace campaign command and control processes, including rapid technology assessment on behalf of the warfighter. Through their facilities at Hurlburt Field and several geographically separated groups, squadrons and detachments, the 505 CCW possesses the unique ability to test, exercise, experiment and train all elements of C2: people, processes and systems.

With exercises such as BLUE FLAG and Joint Expeditionary Force Experiment, the men and women of the 505 CCW conduct specialized training in planning and execution of joint operations for the USAF, sister services and coalition partners, as well as readiness training for Numbered Air Forces.

In addition, the 505 CCW manages operational tests and evaluations and conducts acceptance tests of command, control, communications, computers and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems. Unit personnel evaluate capabilities and limitations, determine optimum operation configuration, identify operating deficiencies and recommend corrective action for United States C2 architectures.

On behalf of the USAF, the 505 CCW is proud to host the future of joint training: Joint RED FLAG. Joint RED FLAG, primarily staged from Nellis AFB, has expanded to include many bases throughout the U.S. including Hurlburt Field. Planners from the 505 CCW help to write the exercise scenario and craft unexpected events to challenge America's warfighters. Through virtual scenarios and networked training, participants are able to participate through actual, virtual or constructive means, allowing the 505 CCW to train for tomorrow's scenarios regardless of a unit's location.

The 505 CCW is also responsible for dynamic evaluation of emerging technologies and procedures for inclusion in the Air Force's C2 architecture.

The wing is comprised of a group and five squadrons located at Hurlburt Field; a group at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico; a group at Nellis AFB, Nevada; and a detachment at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The 605th Test and Evaluation Squadron has detachments in Seattle, Washington and Melbourne, Florida. The 505th Training Squadron has a detachment at Ft. McPherson, Georgia and liaisons from the Army, Navy and Marines.

Emblem Significance
The blue background represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. The bamboo curtain signifies the units service in Vietnam. The control and direction of strike aircraft against the enemy by Forward Air Controllers is symbolized by the flight symbols in chief. The flight symbols in base allude to the control of aircraft for effective air defense. The double bevile refers to lightning and represents the unit's complete ground/air communications support, search and direction capability. The crescents symbolize the moon going through its phases and represent the Wing's continuing performance of its mission month in and month out. The emblem bears the National colors and the Air Force colors of gold and ultramarine blue.